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Japanese Architecture

The Golgi Structure by Fumihiko Maki, 1968
Japanese Architecture, Urban Design

The Golgi Structure by Fumihiko Maki, 1968

Maki’s Golgi Structures designed in 1968 by Fumihiko Maki was named after Nobel Prize-winner Camillo Golgi, who developed techniques for visualising nerve cell bodies. The structure proposed by Maki alternate dense urban areas with unstructured open spaces. Encasing the latter are light-absorbing cells that facilitate communication, energy distribution and mechanical systems.

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Agricultural City, 1960 / Kisho Kurokawa
Japanese Architecture, Urban Design

Agricultural City, 1960 / Kisho Kurokawa

Japanese architect Kisho Kurokawa designed in 1960 the “Agricultural City”. Intended for the replacement of the agricultural towns in Aichi destroyed by the Ise Bay Typhoon in 1959, the accommodation was to be raised above the ground to deal with future Flooding. The grid was intended to be between 300 and 500 metres; Kurokawa challenged the assumption that the city and the country need be in…

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Pigment Shop / Kengo Kuma
Japanese Architecture, Retail

Pigment Shop / Kengo Kuma

In Tokyo, Architect Kengo Kuma was chosen to design Pigment, an art-supply shop like no other. With more than 4,200 pigments as well as 600 paintbrushes and 50 types of rare glue, this is an artist’s dream come true. None artist also come to adminre the interior by Kengo Kuma & Associates which recently won the National Stadium for the…

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Cultural Hall Natyura in Iiyama / Kengo Kuma
Cultural Architecture, Japanese Architecture

Cultural Hall Natyura in Iiyama / Kengo Kuma

In Iiyama, Nagano, Architect Kengo Kuma which recently won the National Stadium for the 2020 Olympic Games, was chosen to design the Natyura Cultural Hall. This community complex features two large halls in addition to a civic center, providing the local population with a place to congregate and socialize. The inaguration coincide with the completion of a high speed railway…

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Art, Japanese Architecture, Landscape Architecture

Yoro Park: The Site Of Reversible Destiny / Arakawa & Gins

The Site of Reversible Destiny is an “experience park” opened in 1995 designed by Nagoya-born, New York-based artist Arakawa Shusaku and his wife and artistic partner, poet Madeline Gins. The theme of the park is “encountering the unexpected,” spreading across about 18,000 square meters. The artist Shusaku Arakawa and poet Madeline Gins realized  here their bold and reckless 30-year vision. The site…

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