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20th Century Retrospective

World Peace Memorial Cathedral / Togo Murano
20th Century Retrospective, Japanese Architecture, Religious Architecture

World Peace Memorial Cathedral / Togo Murano

Built in 1946 by Japanese Architect Togo Murano, the World Peace Memorial Cathedral is a Catholic Catholic Church constructed in remembrance of A-bomb and war victims, and also to pray for world peace. The building was designated an important cultural property as the first architecture after World War II along with the Peace Memorial Museum by Kenzo Tange.

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The Nordic Pavilion in Brussels for the World Exhibition of 1962 / Sverre Fehn
20th Century Retrospective, Cultural Architecture

The Nordic Pavilion in Brussels for the World Exhibition of 1962 / Sverre Fehn

The Nordic Pavilion for the Venice Biennale (1958-1962), designed by Sverre Fehn to represent Sweden, Finland, and Norway, is a project that deals with Nordic identity. In his work, Fehn makes an analogy between building and storytelling, and between materials and language. In this article we also included photographs of the Norwegian Pavilion for the 1958 Brussels World Exhibition that…

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From Furniture to City planning: Kenji Ekuan designs at his best
20th Century Retrospective, Product Design, Utopian Projects

Kenji Ekuan’s Stimulating Projects from Furniture Design to City Planning

Kenji Ekuan was a Japanese industrial designer, best known for creating the design of the Kikkoman soy sauce bottle. His designs originate from the sights of Hiroshima’s devastation after the U.S. atomic bombing of the city 70 years ago. He heard the voices of street cars, bicycles and other objects mangled and abandoned, saying they had wished to have been utilized…

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20th Century Retrospective, Landscape Architecture, Utopian Projects

Mobile Architecture / Yona Friedman

During the 50’s a new architectural concept was developed by Yona Friedman in collaboration with the group GEAM “Groupe d’étude d’architecture mobile”. In 1958 the Hungarian-Israeli architect published a manifesto called Architecture Mobile that fostered a new type of free citizen able to conquer the space through huge ‘superstructures’ over  the existing cities. Friedman envisioned that the increase of leisure time…

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