Tag

Metabolist Architecture

Metabolism was a post-war Japanese architectural movement that fused ideas about architectural megastructures with those of organic biological growth. It had its first international exposure during CIAM’s 1959 meeting and its ideas were tentatively tested by students from Kenzo Tange’s MIT studio.

The Golgi Structure by Fumihiko Maki, 1968
Japanese Architecture, Urban Design

The Golgi Structure by Fumihiko Maki, 1968

Maki’s Golgi Structures designed in 1968 by Fumihiko Maki was named after Nobel Prize-winner Camillo Golgi, who developed techniques for visualising nerve cell bodies. The structure proposed by Maki alternate dense urban areas with unstructured open spaces. Encasing the latter are light-absorbing cells that facilitate communication, energy distribution and mechanical systems.

Continue reading
Agricultural City, 1960 / Kisho Kurokawa
Japanese Architecture, Urban Design

Agricultural City, 1960 / Kisho Kurokawa

Japanese architect Kisho Kurokawa designed in 1960 the “Agricultural City”. Intended for the replacement of the agricultural towns in Aichi destroyed by the Ise Bay Typhoon in 1959, the accommodation was to be raised above the ground to deal with future Flooding. The grid was intended to be between 300 and 500 metres; Kurokawa challenged the assumption that the city and the country need be in…

Continue reading
Nakagin Capsule Tower / Kisho Kurokawa
Japanese Architecture, Residential

Nakagin Capsule Tower in Tokyo / Kisho Kurokawa

The Nakagin Capsule Tower designed by the Japanese Architect Kisho Kurokawa is a mixed-use residential and office tower located in the center of Tokyo, Japan. Completed in 1972, the building is a rare remaining example of Japanese Metabolism, an architectural movement emblematic of Japan’s postwar cultural resurgence. It was the world’s first example of capsule architecture built for permanent and practical use.

Continue reading
From Furniture to City planning: Kenji Ekuan designs at his best
20th Century Retrospective, Product Design, Utopian Projects

Kenji Ekuan’s Stimulating Projects from Furniture Design to City Planning

Kenji Ekuan was a Japanese industrial designer, best known for creating the design of the Kikkoman soy sauce bottle. His designs originate from the sights of Hiroshima’s devastation after the U.S. atomic bombing of the city 70 years ago. He heard the voices of street cars, bicycles and other objects mangled and abandoned, saying they had wished to have been utilized…

Continue reading
Yoyogi National Gymnasium / Kenzo Tange
20th Century Retrospective, Educational & Sports Facilities, Japanese Architecture

National Gymnasium for Tokyo Olympics / Kenzo Tange

As in the past, with the Yoyogi National Gymnasium Kenzo Tange continues to stimulate the creative possibilities of the architecture of our times. Designed and built between 1961 and 1964 to house swimming and diving events in the 1964 Summer Olympics, the design inspired Frei Otto’s arena designs for the Olympic Stadium in Munich.

Continue reading