Badajoz Congress Center / Selgas Cano

© Roland Halbe

The Badajoz Congress Center by Selgas Cano is situated inside a pentagonal molded fortress, part of the seventeenth-century city defensive walls and more recently, going back to 1859, a bullring. The unique features of the site prompted to search for a daring scheme that not only acknowledged this heritage but also endeavored to preserve it, inviting it to form part of its identity.

Badajoz Congress Center Technical Information

As the work progressed at the site, instead of something appearing, it disappeared diluted in that palimpsest inheritance that from the beginning we assumed and which maintenance became our unique objective.

– Selgas Cano1

Badajoz Congress Center Photographs
Badajoz Congress Center / Selgas Cano

© Roland Halbe

Badajoz Congress Center / Selgas Cano

© Roland Halbe

Badajoz Congress Center / Selgas Cano

© Roland Halbe

Badajoz Congress Center / Selgas Cano

© Roland Halbe

Badajoz Congress Center / Selgas Cano

© Roland Halbe

Badajoz Congress Center / Selgas Cano

© Roland Halbe

Badajoz Congress Center / Selgas Cano

© Roland Halbe

Badajoz Congress Center / Selgas Cano

© Roland Halbe

Badajoz Congress Center / Selgas Cano

© Roland Halbe

Badajoz Congress Center / Selgas Cano

© Roland Halbe

Badajoz Congress Center / Selgas Cano

© Roland Halbe

Badajoz Congress Center / Selgas Cano

© Roland Halbe

Text by the Architects

The Badajoz Congress Center is situated inside a pentagonal molded fortress, part of the seventeenth-century city dividers. There used to be an old bullring on the site, going back to 1859. The development utilizes the bullring’s exhumed foot-shaped impression as a beginning stage, constructing the congress lobby in the space where the enclosure used to be, and wrapping it with a straightforward skin produced using fiberglass rings.

The round and hollow walled-in area of the main corridor is encompassed by translucent methacrylate panels, transforming it into a brilliant volume around evening time. So as to keep the clarity of the volume in place, the primary access is done through a staircase going down from the public square in front of the building to an underground lobby, illuminated by skylights and sunken courtyards.

The complexity of placing a Palace of Congresses in an empty spot and that this spot continues being empty is resolved by means of a easy trick that consists of reversing the place for the spectators and bringing the white earth to the center, and taking the empty center alongside the spectators, to the place of the old spectator terraces.

– SelgasCano

The project preserves the character of this space obtained in the 19th century after emptying up a circle in the massive pentagonal fortress, thus distorting its defensive nature. To maintain this footprint, the rest of the site is filled radially, distributing as many elements of the program as possible underground. This poses a new question: how to place the large congress hall in the open central space and at the same maintain the impression of it being empty.

The inventive device that allows achieving this effect involves taking the spectators’ area to the old arena and moving the central space to the stands. The scheme is rounded off by surrounding the new hall with a cylindrical enclosure that juts out five floors above street level, which, made of translucent methacrylate, manages to dematerialize the building and turn it into a luminous volume, which is surrounded by yet another external cylinder formed by polyester and fiberglass rings that join the game by marking an uncertain limit to the deceptive void.

José Selgas describes the work of the office in the following way:

We like to be open to every possibility in every project. We come with open eyes and with the possibility to go in any direction. We are architects, not artists. We always try to bring something to the table that is beyond our personal thoughts. All of our projects incorporate different inputs that come from different directions, but typically, they’re always related to nature, climate, society, history, scale, and—more than anything—economy.

– José Selgas

Badajoz Congress Center Plans
Badajoz Congress Center by Selgas Cano_05

Badajoz Congress Center Floor Plan | © SelgasCano

Badajoz Congress Center / Selgas Cano

Badajoz Congress Center Floor Plan | © SelgasCano

Badajoz Congress Center / Selgas Cano

Badajoz Congress Center Sections | © SelgasCano

Badajoz Congress gallery

© Jesús Granada

About SelgasCano

SelgasCano is a Spanish architectural office based in Madrid and founded in 1998 by José Selgas and Lucía Cano. The atelier focuses on the use of polychromy, creative exploration of new materials, and the relationship between architecture and its surrounding landscape.

Their work includes three Auditoriums and congress centers in Spain, several office buildings such as Second Home, a school in Kibera Nairobi, a vaccination center in Turkana Kenya, and several public pavilions including the 15th annual Serpentine Pavilion 2015 in London, which was re-installed at La Brea Tar Pits in Los Angeles in 2019.

  1. El Croquis 171: Selgascano 2003-2013 (English and Spanish Edition)

Cite this article: "Badajoz Congress Center / Selgas Cano" in ArchEyes, February 24, 2016, https://archeyes.com/badajoz-congress-center-selgas-cano/.