Pershing Square in DTLA Legorreta + Legorreta and Laurie Olin

View of the Square towards 6th Street | © ArchEyes

In 1993, Legorreta + Legorreta and landscape architect Laurie Olin Architects completed the Pershing Square’s last renovation in the City of Los Angeles. The five acres public park dates from 1781 and currently lies on top of a large underground parking garage.

Pershing Square in DTLA Technical Information

To a certain extent, the constant evolution of Pershing Square is really a part of its history, and part of its identity. This is a space that has continually evolved throughout its history, for better or for worse.

– Sara Hernandez1

Pershing Square Photographs
Pershing Square in DTLA / Legorreta + Legorreta & Laurie Olin

Pershing Square Tower | © ArchEyes

Pershing Square in DTLA / Legorreta + Legorreta & Laurie Olin

Colors at Pershing Square | © ArchEyes

Openings - Pershing Square in DTLA / Legorreta + Legorreta & Laurie Olin

Green Areas | © ArchEyes

Pershing Square in DTLA / Legorreta + Legorreta & Laurie Olin

Shaded Areas | © ArchEyes

Openings and rythm

Square Entrance | © ArchEyes

Tower view from the square

Tower view from the square | © ArchEyes

Green Spaces

View of the Square towards 5th Street | © ArchEyes

Pet Area

Pet Area | © ArchEyes

Beethoven Statue at Pershing Square

Beethoven Statue at Pershing Square | © ArchEyes

Pershing Square Access

Pershing Square Access | © ArchEyes

History of Pershing Square

The five acres that make up Pershing Square are original pueblo lands whose ownership can be traced back to 1781 when Spain granted them to the City of Los Angeles. In 1866, the area was set aside as a public park known as La Plaza Abaja (“The Lower Plaza”). Improvements, including the planting of cypress and citrus trees, were made to the park in the 1870s.

In the 1880s, city engineer Fred Eaton created the park’s first official layout. During Los Angeles’ real estate boom of 1910-11, architect John Parkinson redesigned the park in a formal Beaux-Arts style. In 1918, one week after World War I, the square was renamed in honor of General John Pershing, commander of the American armed forces overseas.

Over the ensuing decades, various design changes were made to the square, most notably the addition of an underground parking garage in 1951. As a result, the lush landscaping that had characterized the park for the last eight decades was removed. Trees were placed into planters, and small flowerbeds were installed.

With access ramps to the garage effectively cutting off the park from the surrounding area, the square gradually fell into disuse and disrepair throughout the 1960s and ’70s. In 1984, it was cleaned and replanted for the Olympics, but it was almost a decade later when the square received a full facelift.

Over the ensuing decades, various design changes were made to the square, most notably the addition of an underground parking garage in 1951. As a result, the lush landscaping that had characterized the park for the last eight decades was removed.

Pershing Square Renovation

In 1992, the park was closed for a major redesign and renovation by Mexican architect and landscape architect Ricardo Legorreta and U.S. landscape architect Laurie Olin. The redesigned park opened in 1994 with an impressive 10-story purple bell tower and artistic interpretations of the city’s history and culture, such as the walkway representing an earthquake fault line by artist Barbara McCarren.

As the architect mentioned, the block was too large to function as a single symmetrical space. Therefore, it was transformed into two wide squares linked to the East-West passage’s surrounding context. The change in level from North to South is solved through a wide ramp and steps along this centerline. The plaza’s focal point is the 38-meter tower, which, at the base, has water running and causing a tidal action every eight minutes.

Two bright yellow buildings form the connection between the north and south squares: one, the triangular-shaped transit center, and the Pershing Square cafe overlooking the bustling park.

In the north square, the brightly painted walls of different sizes define spaces and create meeting places. The walls are perforated in the shape of squares, rectangles, and circles to create windows that are framed in shades of pink and purple. Huge spheres, a symbol of Legorreta Arquitectos and palm trees, identify and shape spaces.

Pershing Historic Photograph

Histroric Photographs

Pershing Square Image Gallery
About Legorreta + Legorreta

Since its founding in 1965 by Ricardo Legorreta, Noe Castro, and Carlos Vargas, the firm has managed to stay true to their original goal of creating the best architecture inspired by human values. Achieving functionality, efficiency, and cost control, they design-friendly and social environments, with atmospheres that convey peace, privacy, and optimism.

Other works from Legorreta + Legorreta 

About OLIN

OLIN is an international landscape architecture, comprehensive planning, and urban design firm founded in Philadelphia in 1976 by Laurie Olin and Robert Hanna. The firm work is predicated upon social engagement, craft, detail, materiality, and timelessness.

Other works from OLIN

  1. Sara Hernandez – Special Counsel to Los Angeles City Council  – Interview by Frances Anderton at KCRW titled L.A. Galleries Head to Art Basel, Pershing Square Redesign?
Cite this article: "Pershing Square in DTLA / Legorreta + Legorreta & Laurie Olin" in ArchEyes, October 26, 2020, https://archeyes.com/pershing-square-in-dtla-legorreta-legorreta-laurie-olin/.