Collective Housing in Tokyo / Akihisa Hirata

© Tomohiro Sakashita

Japanese practice Akihisa Hirata Architecture office looked to the larger scale of the neighborhood to design the concept for a Collective Housing in Tokyo titled’ kotoriku’: the irregular roads define the different areas of activity with varying qualities of space, light, and material.

Collective Housing in Tokyo technical information

I want to create an architecture that is ecological in the purest sense of the word. ‘Tangling‘ is the term I prefer for it.

– Akihisa Hirata

Collective Housing in Tokyo Photographs
Collective Housing in Tokyo / Akihisa Hirata

© Tomohiro Sakashita

Collective Housing in Tokyo / Akihisa Hirata

© Tomohiro Sakashita

Collective Housing in Tokyo / Akihisa Hirata

© Tomohiro Sakashita

Collective Housing in Tokyo / Akihisa Hirata

© Tomohiro Sakashita

Collective Housing in Tokyo / Akihisa Hirata

© Tomohiro Sakashita

Collective Housing in Tokyo Article

By now Akihisa Hirata’s work has been widely published overseas, and his clients are no longer limited to Japan. The architectural concepts of ‘fermented’ and ‘tangling’ architecture have been developed overseas, as the architect revealed in his solo exhibition at the Architectural Foundation in London (2012) and during Milan Design Week. Akishisa Hirata is one of the five Japanese Architects chosen to exhibit in the exhibition for the MoMa Museum A Japanese Constellation.

In the Tokyo collective house it was the concept of irregular roads that define the impetus for the design. The structure is composed of crumbling concrete walls that encircle the site while layers of radically different floor plans, resembling voronoi diagrams, formulate the different living areas within.

The land level contains shared open public spaces where a central staircase can be used to reach the different units. Each apartment has its own exclusive floor plan, materials and angles. Every space combines a mixture of texture but they all have concrete walls. In a way, each floor is understood as a little city, with its own unique areas and relations with the outside world. Each space is unique in size, condition and shape which defines the character of the apartment.

Collective Housing in Tokyo Plans

Collective Housing in Tokyo / Akihisa Hirata

Collective Housing in Tokyo / Akihisa Hirata

Collective Housing in Tokyo Gallery

About Akihisa Hirata

Born in Osaka in 1971, he received in 1997 a master’s degree from the Kyoto University Graduate School of Engineering. After working at Toyo Ito & Associates, he established Akihisa Hirata architecture office in 2005. He is currently a specially-appointed associate professor at the Tohoku University and a part-time lecturer at the Kyoto University and at the Tokyo University.

He has been awarded with the 19th Japan Institute of Architects Newcomer Prize, second prize in the Kaoshiung Maritime Cultural & Popular Music Center International Competition (2011), Elita Design Award (2012), Golden Lion at the Venice Biennale with Toyo Ito, Naoya Hatakeyama, Sou Fujimoto, Kumiko Inui (2012), first prize in the Kamaishi City Disaster Recovery Public Housing Proposal (2012) and first prize in the Ota City Library and Museum Proposal (2014).

More Works from Akisa Hirata

Cite this article: "Collective Housing in Tokyo / Akihisa Hirata," in ArchEyes, April 5, 2016, http://archeyes.com/collective-housing-tokyo/.