Jan Kaplický Drawings / Future Systems

© Jan Kaplický Archives

Jan Kaplický was a world-renowned Neofuturistic Czech architect who spent a significant part of his life in the United Kingdom. He constantly developed and honed his graphic language, perfecting the technique of the cutaway isometric which became his trademark.

Jan Kaplický drawings technical data

It’s not a sign of creativity to have sixty-five ideas for one problem. It’s just a waste of energy.

– Jan Kaplický

Jan Kaplický drawings
Jan Kaplický Drawings / Future Systems

© Jan Kaplický Archives

Jan Kaplický Drawings / Future Systems

© Jan Kaplický Archives

Jan Kaplický Drawings / Future Systems

© Jan Kaplický Archives

Jan Kaplický Drawings / Future Systems

© Jan Kaplický Archives

Jan Kaplický Drawings / Future Systems

© Jan Kaplický Archives

Jan Kaplický Drawings / Future Systems

© Jan Kaplický Archives

Jan Kaplický Drawings / Future Systems

© Jan Kaplický Archives

Jan Kaplický Drawings / Future Systems

© Jan Kaplický Archives

Jan Kaplický Drawings / Future Systems

© Jan Kaplický Archives

Jan Kaplický Drawings / Future Systems

© Jan Kaplický Archives

About Jan Kaplický drawings

Jan Kaplický (18 April 1937 – 14 January 2009) was one of the world’s last great architectural and artistic draughtsmen with a passion for drawing as a way of discovering, describing and constructing. Born in the Czech Republic through drawing he presented beguiling architectural imagery upholding a heritage that has its roots in the early Renaissance. He was a world-renowned Neofuturistic who spent a significant part of his life in the United Kingdom.

In the 1970s Kaplicky designed his earliest projects when drawing was essentially a speculative pursuit. During evenings and weekends he designed and drew at home whilst his days were spent working for other architects. Never satisfied, he constantly developed and honed his graphic language, perfecting the technique of the cutaway isometric which became his trademark.

The drawings shown date from the early years of his independent practice, Future Systems, in the 1970s, to his final ink drawings, executed in the mid-1990s. Featured projects range from design studies for the International Space Station, undertaken with NASA, to the Media Centre at Lord’s Cricket Ground, in London, winner of the 1999 Stirling Prize.

In 1979 Kaplicky founded Future Systems with David Nixon. He was the leading architect behind the innovative design office, Future Systems. He was best known for the neofuturistic Selfridges Building in Birmingham, England, and the Media Centre at Lord’s Cricket Ground in London. Clients included NASA, for whom they produced design studies for the International Space Station. Ten years later a new partnership with Amanda Levete prompted Future Systems to build – and with building came a new creative discipline. The Media Centre at Lord’s Cricket Ground, winner of the 1999 Stirling Prize, was the last project that Kaplicky drew entirely by hand. From then on, formal drawings were done with computers by others and he took delight in sketching.

Cite this article: "11 Amazing Drawings of Neofuturistic Architecture by Jan Kaplický," in ArchEyes, April 6, 2016, http://archeyes.com/jan-kaplicky-drawings/.